Is gamification the key to workplace satisfaction?

Motivation is an eternal struggles for jobseekers, managers and employees. New research has discovered that video games hold the solution.


Dwight D. Eisenhower said “motivation is the art of getting people to do what you want them to do because they want to do it.” He makes it sound easy, but finding ways to stay motivated at work is a challenge we’ve all faced in the past, if not daily.

Thankfully, new research has emerged that believes it has cracked the code for people struggling to stay motivated. Whether you’ve just started your job search or are in the middle of your first role, these techniques are sure to help you get ahead and stay ahead.

Rather surprisingly, the key to staying motivated in the workplace stems from video games – a common source of distraction for most people. Badgeville, a company that specialises in changing work habits, found that elements of video games can function as incentives for the nation’s workers.

Called gamification, the trend borrows from basic video game trends such as points, leaderboards and levels, so whether you’re interested in Counter Strike or Candy Crush, it will still have the same effect.

It’s no minor motivational increase either, with the company finding that gamification can increase productivity by up to 90 per cent. Goal awareness also rises as much as 86 per cent in instances where gamification is used.

According to Badgeville CEO Jon Shalowitz​, gamification displays the importance of taking employee incentives beyond the ordinary.

“Organisations who want to retain top talent while keeping employees working hard should look beyond salary and monetary bonuses,” he says.

“It’s a wise long-term investment to create an environment where employees can manage, visualise and digitally share their performance, achievements and skills.”

These trends are expected to become more valuable in the near future too, with Markets and Markets predicting that the industry for these solutions will be worth US$5.5 billion by 2018.